Die letzten Artikel

The Eighteenth Century with Black Powder

Black Powder covers scenarios spanning over 200 years. In this long period of time, of course, the warfare has changed constantly.

In fact, the Black Powder rules make it easy to visualize all the scenarios over this period. The expansion volumes for Black Powder therefore provide not only tons of background material, scenarios and army lists, but also the respective special rules and rule modifications that characterize the respective epoch.

The special rules for the 18th century can be found in the expansion band The Last Argument of Kings.

black-powder_18th-century_0

Formations

Often Wargamer assume that it did not give formations like the square in the 18th century. But that is wrong! Apart from the column of assault, in the eighteenth century there were the same formations that are characteristic of the nineteenth century (line, marching column, square).

The square

The eighteenth-century infantry was very self-consciously opposed to cavalry attacks. If the flanks of the unit involved were covered, and this was attacked head-on, the infantry had grown mostly the task of a frontal attack cavalry on itself. Therefore, in the case of a cavalry attack, only isolated infantry units must form a square. All units with at least one covered flank maintain the formation and expect the attack (usually in line). If an isolated unit is attacked, it must form a square.
Infantry and cavalry should be used consciously in the game, according to military history. The tasks, the movement, the reactions, the successes and the positioning of the units are thus different and the games will be fundamentally different.

Linienformation

Der militärische Drill war im Achtzehnten Jahrhundert noch schwächer ausgeprägt. Hunderte von Männern in Linie zu formieren war kein leichtes Unterfangen, schon gar nicht in der Hitze des Gefechts. Deshalb funktioniert das Umformieren in Linie nach The Last Argument of Kings etwas anders als im Grundregelwerk.

The eighteenth-century infantry was very self-consciously opposed to cavalry attacks. If the flanks of the unit involved were covered, and this was attacked head-on, the infantry had grown mostly the task of a frontal attack cavalry on itself. Therefore, in the case of a cavalry attack only isolated infantry units must form a square. All units with at least one covered flank maintain the formation and expect the attack (usually in line). If an isolated unit is attacked, it must form a square.
Infantry and cavalry should be used consciously in the game, according to military history. The tasks, the movement, the reactions, the successes and the positioning of the units are thus different and the games will be fundamentally different.

What does this mean for the game? The generals would do well to bring their units into line formation long before the enemy is in attack range!
As you can easily imagine, this circumstance, even without direct threat, makes the movement of the army much more difficult.

It is therefore advisable to reshape the units by regimental commands – if the single hangs are commanded individually, and if (as is normally the case) the commands are carried out at different speeds (different number of movement actions after the command roll), a confused mess arises quickly. Of course, in the ensuing clutter, the units naturally become sensitive. An enemy who observes such chaos will quickly advance to take the army by surprise.

The historic threshold for units to leave the march column was the Seven Years War, but there the Prussians were far ahead of the other armies, which is why only the Prussians are able to do so in this conflict. After the Seven Years War, this drill has largely become established as a standard.

Weapons technology

The loading process of the firearms (muzzle loaders) was much more time consuming in this epoch. This is also implemented coherently. Units that are to fire this turn may move a maximum of one move action! Units that have moved two or three actions can not fire this turn.

That should be considered in the game necessarily …

Conclusion

For us, Black Powder is even more fun in the Eighteenth Century than in the classic epochs like the Napoleonic Wars and the American Civil War (which we otherwise play). The behavior of the troops is very interesting and presents the players with new challenges. The implementation feels very realistic and makes the game even more tactically challenging.

I recommend anyone who somehow has access to miniatures that represent the Eighteenth Century, once to test this highly charged epoch (background and strategy). An army project for this era definitely pays off with Black Powder!

In our first games in this epoch, we were pleased to see how sophisticated the Black Powder rules are. We are excited!

The Last Argument of Kings is an absolute insider tip.

Review Expansion Band Black Powder, The Last Argument of Kings

 

 

 

 

 

%d Bloggern gefällt das: